How do you remove marks in the mold parts +EDIT:new question

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Kurando
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How do you remove marks in the mold parts +EDIT:new question

Post by Kurando » Mon Dec 17, 2007 5:42 pm

Usually. You get these weird wavey lines in parts in the mold
How do I remove these marks or whatever? Im guessing sanding but is there anything else special to it? I'd rather not screw up my models so I wanna check to make sure.
Last edited by Kurando on Thu Dec 20, 2007 6:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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SNT1
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Post by SNT1 » Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:11 pm

sandpaper, rough -> medium -> fine.
(>-.-)>-} >>---> \(x.x)/

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Blade of the Red Comet
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Post by Blade of the Red Comet » Wed Dec 19, 2007 5:31 pm

Fine grain sandpaper + water = easy fix

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Kurando
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Post by Kurando » Thu Dec 20, 2007 2:40 pm

I'd rather not make a new topic for this so ill ask here. When you use a exato knife the part you sliced off leaves a rougher and less shiney look on the part and it sticks out. How do you get rid of this WITHOUT sanding!

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Blade of the Red Comet
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Post by Blade of the Red Comet » Thu Dec 20, 2007 4:46 pm

^^ This takes an extremely steady hand, but you can gently slide the xacto along the ragged spru to slice it off. When I cut pieces off the sprus I use a snipper but leave a good sized chunk of spru left on the piece. It actually makes it a bit easier to cut off a larger left over piece of spru than a smaller one. This can be dangerous though, I've sliced my thumb a bunch of times doing this...and it can be dangerous fo the piece as well. If your aim is off just a tad you can irrevocably scar the piece, unless you plan on puttying and painting the model. After using the xacto is when I'd use a very fine grain sandpaper dipped in water to fix any imperfections. I've also seen this done by submerging the entire plastic piece in water then sanding it underwater....I haven't tried this method yet but my next model I just might have to try it.

EDIT: Use the base of the blade as it tends to stay sharp and pull it towards you parallel to the plastic piece. You can also "scrape sand" with a xacto blade too, but it can leave discolored areas on the plastic.

This is all guess work on my part as to what your asking, though, cause your link is broken.

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Kurando
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Post by Kurando » Thu Dec 20, 2007 6:17 pm

Blade of the Red Comet wrote:^^ This takes an extremely steady hand, but you can gently slide the xacto along the ragged spru to slice it off. When I cut pieces off the sprus I use a snipper but leave a good sized chunk of spru left on the piece. It actually makes it a bit easier to cut off a larger left over piece of spru than a smaller one. This can be dangerous though, I've sliced my thumb a bunch of times doing this...and it can be dangerous fo the piece as well. If your aim is off just a tad you can irrevocably scar the piece, unless you plan on puttying and painting the model. After using the xacto is when I'd use a very fine grain sandpaper dipped in water to fix any imperfections. I've also seen this done by submerging the entire plastic piece in water then sanding it underwater....I haven't tried this method yet but my next model I just might have to try it.

EDIT: Use the base of the blade as it tends to stay sharp and pull it towards you parallel to the plastic piece. You can also "scrape sand" with a xacto blade too, but it can leave discolored areas on the plastic.

This is all guess work on my part as to what your asking, though, cause your link is broken.
Thanks! im asking because the head to one of my MG models has a few tiny bits of excess plastic (not from cutting from the sprue) and I would rather use an exacto knife to get rid of them because they are on very small details on the head that I would be afraid to alter the shape of with sanding since they are VERY small pieces on the head.

I linked to dalong, which, the link expired.. only because it was a direct link to an image

Any more tips would be apreciated!

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Blade of the Red Comet
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Post by Blade of the Red Comet » Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:51 pm

If you could take a pic of the problem area it would be a huge help.

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Kurando
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Post by Kurando » Fri Dec 21, 2007 9:13 am

Blade of the Red Comet wrote:If you could take a pic of the problem area it would be a huge help.
I may try.. but I'm not even sure my camera is even able to keep focus so close since they are small. Ill try to explain better beforehand.

EDIT: Okay I used an image from dalong to show you. I do not own the image and will use a link to show it because im sure dalong won't like it's pics being stolen =/ so ill remove it when I get a few tips

EDIT: PICTUE HAS NOW BEEN REMOVED
Last edited by Kurando on Sun Dec 23, 2007 7:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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ScornMandark
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Post by ScornMandark » Fri Dec 21, 2007 10:48 am

Try using the Xacto at a 45 degree angle to the proper corner to shave off the slag. This way, even if you're a little imprecise, the divot won't be so bad. Also, shave very gently. If the knife starts catching on something, you're probably starting to cut into the model proper rather than the extremely thin slag.

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Kurando
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Post by Kurando » Fri Dec 21, 2007 11:23 am

ScornMandark wrote:Try using the Xacto at a 45 degree angle to the proper corner to shave off the slag. This way, even if you're a little imprecise, the divot won't be so bad. Also, shave very gently. If the knife starts catching on something, you're probably starting to cut into the model proper rather than the extremely thin slag.
Thanks for your help! but the main thing Im just trying to find out is when I use an exacto knife. How can I get rid of the rougher, less shiney part from where you used the exacto knife. And if sanding is the only way.. would sanding something that small really be worth it?

any more tips regarding this would help too anybody.

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Blade of the Red Comet
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Post by Blade of the Red Comet » Fri Dec 21, 2007 11:53 am

You can "scrape sand" with a xacto blade. Kind of what I think Scorn was trying to say. You want slice off as much excess as you can then with the blade angled away from you, pull the blade towards you...kind of like shaving with a straight razor. You want to do this gently and gradually because this method can leave scrape marks if not done right. As is the case in all aspects of modeling, patience is a virtue. If you can hold out I'll take some pics of my Destiny and show you what I'm poorly trying to describe here later today.

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Kurando
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Post by Kurando » Fri Dec 21, 2007 6:07 pm

Blade of the Red Comet wrote:You can "scrape sand" with a xacto blade. Kind of what I think Scorn was trying to say. You want slice off as much excess as you can then with the blade angled away from you, pull the blade towards you...kind of like shaving with a straight razor. You want to do this gently and gradually because this method can leave scrape marks if not done right. As is the case in all aspects of modeling, patience is a virtue. If you can hold out I'll take some pics of my Destiny and show you what I'm poorly trying to describe here later today.
Do you mean kinda (keyword: KINDA) like when using a knife to scrape off butter? If so, Ill test that out beforhand. Thanks!

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Blade of the Red Comet
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Post by Blade of the Red Comet » Fri Dec 21, 2007 7:37 pm

Yeah, "kinda" like scraping the top of a stick of butter. You want to angle the blade away from you and pull towards your thumb.

Here are the pics though:
This is the area on your model in question? Right behind those 2 little bumps on the side?
If so, then this would be the angle I would cut at so you can use those bumps as a stop for the blade. You need to be very gentle with the cut though as you might slice those bumps right off with the flashing. Hope I helped you out, dude. In the future, though, it helps ALOT to remove all flashings and even line all of the panel lines before assembly...and obviously prime and paint if you go all out.

Just for kicks!

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Kurando
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Post by Kurando » Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:08 pm

Blade of the Red Comet wrote:Yeah, "kinda" like scraping the top of a stick of butter. You want to angle the blade away from you and pull towards your thumb.

Here are the pics though:
This is the area on your model in question? Right behind those 2 little bumps on the side?
If so, then this would be the angle I would cut at so you can use those bumps as a stop for the blade. You need to be very gentle with the cut though as you might slice those bumps right off with the flashing. Hope I helped you out, dude. In the future, though, it helps ALOT to remove all flashings and even line all of the panel lines before assembly...and obviously prime and paint if you go all out.

Just for kicks!
No... they are more like this. They are actually ON the bump thingys right on the line where shown on this picture. The arrow is just to direct you to the line I drew.
http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u232 ... upcopy.jpg

And just for kicks..
http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u232 ... AMcopy.jpg

Thanks for all the help guys!

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